lolitserica:

hrtbps:

The ‘Napalm Girl’, 40 years later
Joe McNally, who was commissioned by LIFE magazine to find and photograph subjects of Pulitzer Prize winning photos, shot Kim Phuc – the girl running from an airborne attack in this devastatingly iconic shot during the Vietnam War.
The original photo was taken by AP photographer Nick Ut, and turned Kim into a propaganda tool for the anti-war movement.  Joe had the privilege of meeting and photographing Kim, who had recently given birth to her newborn son. Joe knew to treat the situation with care, since showcasing her scars from the napalm burn was significant.
“For me, doing this assignment reconfirmed so many things I’ve always believed about photography,” says Joe in his blog post “On a Road, 40 Years Ago“. “That photo made on that horrible day was made in less than a second. Yet a lifetime spun on its power. With so many photographs being taken everywhere, easily, and thoughtlessly, it’s easy to forget how powerful they can be, and occasionally are.” (via)

I read the book based on Kim’s life, The Girl in the Picture.  I definitely recommend it.

lolitserica:

hrtbps:

The ‘Napalm Girl’, 40 years later

Joe McNally, who was commissioned by LIFE magazine to find and photograph subjects of Pulitzer Prize winning photos, shot Kim Phuc – the girl running from an airborne attack in this devastatingly iconic shot during the Vietnam War.

The original photo was taken by AP photographer Nick Ut, and turned Kim into a propaganda tool for the anti-war movement.  Joe had the privilege of meeting and photographing Kim, who had recently given birth to her newborn son. Joe knew to treat the situation with care, since showcasing her scars from the napalm burn was significant.

“For me, doing this assignment reconfirmed so many things I’ve always believed about photography,” says Joe in his blog post “On a Road, 40 Years Ago“. “That photo made on that horrible day was made in less than a second. Yet a lifetime spun on its power. With so many photographs being taken everywhere, easily, and thoughtlessly, it’s easy to forget how powerful they can be, and occasionally are.” (via)

I read the book based on Kim’s life, The Girl in the Picture.
I definitely recommend it.
fotojournalismus:

Dani tribeswoman walking on a road through the Baliem Valley, Irian Jaya (today West Papua), Indonesia, 1989.
[Credit : Susan Meiselas]

“The Dani people of Indonesia were “discovered” in 1938 when an aeroplane crashed in West Papua, near the Baliem valley, where they live. They were once considered an almost stone-age people, but a number of anthropologists and missionaries have been to the region since, so their traditional customs are growing fewer, although the older generations still live close to the way they did.
I was there in 1989, with the film-maker Bob Gardner, simply looking at what daily life was like. I might spend a day in the gardens watching people plant or harvest sweet potatoes, which is their principal crop, or climbing up into the forest where they were cutting down wood with stone axes. I was also interested in the line between their traditions and the modern world. This new road had significantly changed the community. I used to take long walks down it, and watch it at all times of day - in order to understand what it brought to them, and what it took away.
And one day I saw this woman. She used that stick to dig up her sweet potatoes, and is now carrying them in a net hanging from her head. The light colour on her body is ash: she is honouring someone’s death. The skirt she is wearing is not the traditional grass one, but that is the only detail that is different from the way she would have grown up.
It could have been that I saw her and took a photograph, which drew her attention to me, or maybe she just saw me with a camera and turned. Whatever it was, the picture still fascinates me, because I look at it and wonder what she might be thinking of me making a picture of her. It’s such a direct, quizzical glance. Not confrontational, but for me it asks the question that I always carry around: why am I making this picture? What am I doing?”

- Susan Meiselas, “Photographer Susan Meiselas’s best shot”

fotojournalismus:

Dani tribeswoman walking on a road through the Baliem Valley, Irian Jaya (today West Papua), Indonesia, 1989.

[Credit : Susan Meiselas]

“The Dani people of Indonesia were “discovered” in 1938 when an aeroplane crashed in West Papua, near the Baliem valley, where they live. They were once considered an almost stone-age people, but a number of anthropologists and missionaries have been to the region since, so their traditional customs are growing fewer, although the older generations still live close to the way they did.

I was there in 1989, with the film-maker Bob Gardner, simply looking at what daily life was like. I might spend a day in the gardens watching people plant or harvest sweet potatoes, which is their principal crop, or climbing up into the forest where they were cutting down wood with stone axes. I was also interested in the line between their traditions and the modern world. This new road had significantly changed the community. I used to take long walks down it, and watch it at all times of day - in order to understand what it brought to them, and what it took away.

And one day I saw this woman. She used that stick to dig up her sweet potatoes, and is now carrying them in a net hanging from her head. The light colour on her body is ash: she is honouring someone’s death. The skirt she is wearing is not the traditional grass one, but that is the only detail that is different from the way she would have grown up.

It could have been that I saw her and took a photograph, which drew her attention to me, or maybe she just saw me with a camera and turned. Whatever it was, the picture still fascinates me, because I look at it and wonder what she might be thinking of me making a picture of her. It’s such a direct, quizzical glance. Not confrontational, but for me it asks the question that I always carry around: why am I making this picture? What am I doing?”

- Susan Meiselas, Photographer Susan Meiselas’s best shot”

picturesofwar:

“The feet of 10-year-old Bosnian Muslim boy Elvedin Sendo, clad in grass-stained running shoes and marked with his name tag, protrude from under a blanket at a hospital morgue after his school came under a shelling attack in Sarajevo.”
March 22, 1993
(Chris Helgren/Reuters)

picturesofwar:

“The feet of 10-year-old Bosnian Muslim boy Elvedin Sendo, clad in grass-stained running shoes and marked with his name tag, protrude from under a blanket at a hospital morgue after his school came under a shelling attack in Sarajevo.”

March 22, 1993

(Chris Helgren/Reuters)

farhaaan:

The mother of Mohammed Shawi, 15, cries over his body at a hospital after he was shot by one of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s snipers in Idlib in northwestern Syria on February 22, 2012. [Getty]

(Source: faruhanu)

fotojournalismus:

Iraq’s Youngest Photographer 

(via Reuters)

Qamar Hashim is an 8-year-old Iraqi photographer. He tours famous streets to picture Baghdadis with his single camera and is the youngest Iraqi photographer to win several local awards, according to the Iraqi Society Photographic (ISP).

Below, Qamar responds to a series of questions.


  • When did you take your first photograph and what did it show?

I do not remember exactly the first picture but I had been mimicking my father since I was 4 or 5 years-old and started to take pictures of the Tigris river, the gulls, birds, old houses and heritage places.

  • Why do you think photography is important?

Photography is very important. It documents life and pauses time. We can show the city, life and the people.

  • What do you want to show people about Iraq?

I want to say through my pictures that Iraq is precious and Iraqis are very kind. Iraq is peaceful and has a great history.

  • How do you feel about the U.S. troops leaving Iraq?

I am afraid of the U.S. soldiers, they destroyed the house my family rented in 2003, when I was a fetus. Thank God my family survived and I am happy now for their departure. I am free and not afraid of their tanks.

  • What do you want to be when you finish school?

I like to act and I would like to be a child-activist.

  • Which is your favorite photo you have taken and why?

My favorite picture is of a man sleeping who sells books at al-Mutanabi street. Also a picture of a bee on a rose, I ran a lot to follow the bee until I got this picture.

  • Are there any photographers you look up to?

There a lot of good photographers and I learned from them (Adel Qassim, Fouad Shakir, Kareem al-Ba’aj, and Hameed Majeed).

  • Are there any photos you wish to take but haven’t been able to yet?

The dangerous pictures like fire, blasts, other incidents but I have been sent off the site. They say I am a child. Also I wish to get a picture of the triangle of migrant birds.

  • What does the future of Iraq look like?

I see a flourishing future for Iraq especially when my family owns a house. I love Iraq, my home, and it is more precious than anything else.

crookedindifference:

The War in Hipstamatic: A rare and beautiful look at Afghanistan, through an iPhone

This experiment in photojournalism comes to FP by way of  Teru Kuwayama and Balazs Gardi, who embedded with Marine Battalion 1/8 in Helmand for  five months starting in September 2010. They collaborated with three  other photographers on a project called Basetrack — a multiplatform, social-media cornucopia; a hybrid of digital maps and feeds, Facebook posts and musings, interviews and stunning photographs. We’re pleased to share their remarkable images with our readers.
Read more.

crookedindifference:

The War in Hipstamatic: A rare and beautiful look at Afghanistan, through an iPhone

This experiment in photojournalism comes to FP by way of Teru Kuwayama and Balazs Gardi, who embedded with Marine Battalion 1/8 in Helmand for five months starting in September 2010. They collaborated with three other photographers on a project called Basetrack — a multiplatform, social-media cornucopia; a hybrid of digital maps and feeds, Facebook posts and musings, interviews and stunning photographs. We’re pleased to share their remarkable images with our readers.

Read more.